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The Early Church Fathers on Sunday or the Sabbath.


  • Early Church Fathers
  • From the Scriptures



  1. St. Ignatius of Antioch, (A.D. 50-107)
    The Didache, (A.D. 80-90)
St. Ignatius of Antioch, (A.D. 50-107), Syrian; ecclesiastical writer, bishop, martyr. A disciple of St. John, the Apostle; he was bishop of Antioch, in which see he succeeded St. Peter, or, as others think, Evodius. He is supposed to have governed that church for about forty years. He suffered martyrdom at Rome in the year 107.

[T]hose who were brought up in the ancient order of things [i.e., Jews] have come to the possession of a new hope, no longer observing the Sabbath, but living in the observance of the Lord's day, on which also our life has sprung up again by him and by his death.

Letter to the Magnesians 8 [A.D. 110]

The Didache, (A.D. 80-90) the Teaching of the Twelve Apostles (Didache means "Teaching") is a brief early Christian treatise, dated by most scholars to the late first or early 2nd century.

But every Lord's day . . . gather yourselves together and break bread, and give thanksgiving after having confessed your transgressions, that your sacrifice may be pure. But let no one that is at variance with his fellow come together with you until they be reconciled, that your sacrifice may not be profaned.

Didache 14 [A.D. 70]




It is true that the early Church changed the day of worship from Saturday to Sunday. This in no way violates the teachings of Scripture. Christians live under the New Covenant and not the Old. The Church in its God given authority (Matthew 16:15-19), made the change in honor of the day that Jesus rose from the dead. Scripture records the early Church meeting on the first day (Sunday).

For instance, in Acts 20:7 we read the following: "On the first day of the week, when we were gathered together to break bread, Paul talked with them. . ." The term "to break bread" refers to the Eucharistic celebration which has been the center of Christian worship for the last two thousand years. Money was collected for the needs of the Church on Sunday.


The Church's Scriptures that support Sunday worship:


Peter as head of the Catholic Church has the authority to change the Sabbath for the Church

17 Jesus answered and said to him, "Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah, for flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but My Father who is in Heaven. 18 And I also say to you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build My church, and the gates of Hades shall not prevail against it. 19 And I will give you the keys of the kingdom of Heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in Heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in Heaven."


Matthew 16:13-19

Paul encourages the faithful to set aside contributions of all types to support the Church

2 On the first day of every week, each of you is to put something aside and store it up, as he may prosper, so that contributions need not be made when I come.

1 Corinthians 16:2

Paul testifies Mass was being held every Sunday.

7 On the first day of the week, when we were gathered together to break bread, Paul talked with them, intending to depart [the next day]; and he prolonged his speech until midnight.


Acts 20:7


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